Lecture

GODZILLA

Before this week’s seminar, I have never really watched a Godzilla movie or found anything to do with it interesting. I knew they existed and that there was a movie franchise produced around them but I have never watched one.

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However, I have to say that watching the Godzilla movie this week was quite interesting. I enjoyed it to an extent. The most interesting part of the movie I think was seeing how different the scenes, dialogue, acting, graphics and even sound effects were. When comparing these things to this day and age there is a dramatic difference between them. It’s quite awesome to see how far film has come.

 

My high school gave us the opportunity to learn and study Japanese language, culture and history. The class opened my mind to this very different cultural identity and gave me the opportunity to explore the art of manga and Japanese films. I found that the film Godzilla gave me a different view point of Japan and especially their stance on nuclear energy. I think, however, because I was able to study Japan, I was able to make sense of the film text a whole lot better.

 

Godzilla in the film becomes a metaphor for the nuclear bombing nightmare that happened in Nagasaki and Hiroshima at the time. Images shown the film depict a raging Godzilla producing destruction in the form of a sea of flames, smouldering buildings and apocalyptic ruins. Director Honda explained “I took the characteristics of an atomic bomb and applied them to Godzilla” in an attempt to portray the atomic bomb and the effects that it produced on Nagasaki and Hiroshima during the attack. The portrayal of the character to this day can still be adapted and evolved in an attempt to portray the ideas of climate change and especially the problematic missile tests in North Korea.

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Overall I think that the film was very interesting, it brought up topics that I hadn’t considered or thought about before. Depicting the bombing of Nagasaki and Hiroshima through Godzilla was a great way to emphasise the destruction and fear individuals felt during this time. Let’s hope that the devastation of the bombing will be enough to stop this from happening in the future.

 

DIGC330 Week Five: Digital Artifacts

No set reading for Week 5 as I will be addressing Digital Artifacts (DAs) in lecture this week.

Tutorials will focus on individual research and autoethnographic investigation in the blogs this weeks.

Groups will have time to work on their collaborative projects in the lab seminars.

The Prezi for Week 5 is here

DIGC330 Week Four: Digital Storytelling, Development and Modernity

Welcome to Week 4 of DIGC330 for 2014.

This week Sukhmani has nominated a couple of background readings relevant to the case study on digital storytelling in the lecture time.

Tacchi, Jo A. (2009) ‘Finding a voice : digital storytelling as participatory development in Southeast Asia’. In Hartley, John & McWilliam, Kelly (Eds.) Story circle : digital storytelling around the world. Wiley-Blackwell.

Russo, A., & Watkins, J. (2005, December 31). Digital Cultural Communication: Enabling newmedia and co- creation in Asia. International Journal of Education and Development using ICT [Online], 1(4). Available: http://ijedict.dec.uwi.edu/viewarticle.php?id=107.

Week 4 Power Point slides – DIGC330_Week4

Students will be blogging on their independent research projects this week and using some of lab time to plan and schedule the group project research and production for the following six weeks.

Individual Blogging Task for Week 4

  • Pick a group that is ‘peripheral’ in some sense in an Asian or Asian diasporic research site of your choice.
  • What kinds of digital media do they use to give voice to their own demands and stories?
  • What is your experience of viewing/hearing these stories?

DIGC330 Week Three: Autoethnography and digital artefacts

The Prezi for Week Three is here.

We will discuss your autoethnographic inquires and start to consider ways of using digital artefacts to present your findings.

The reading for Week Three is:

Denzin, Norman K 2003, Performing [Auto] Ethnography Politically,The Review of Education, Pedagogy, and Cultural Studies, 25:257–278 and is available here.

Week One: Auto-ethnography as research and investigating the production, consumption and circulation of Asian digital media

Reading: Ellis, C., Adams, T.E., and Bochner, A.P. (2011) ‘Autoethnography: An Overview’, Forum: Qualitative Social Research, 12:1. http://www.qualitativeresearch.net/index.php/fqs/article/view/1589/3095

The reading this week introduces you to autoethnographic method and lead author, Carolyn Ellis, expands on the approach in this audio lecture on music, ethnographic, reflexive writing and personal storytelling.

http://www.podcast.de/episode/4275855/Carolyn+Ellis+-+Bringing+Reflexive+Writing+and+Personal+Storytelling+to+the+Creative+Arts./

Further Reading:

Alsop, Christiane K. (2002) Home and Away: Self Reflexive Auto-/Ethnography’, Forum Qualitative Social Research 3:3. http://www.utsc.utoronto.ca/~kmacd/IDSC10/Readings/Positionality/auto-eth.pdf