Japanese Graphic Design Culture: Treat/Candy Packaging

DIGITAL ASIA

Since beginning this subject I always had a high interest in investigating the branding & design strategies of Asian countries compared to what I personally know/encounter/experience in every day life. I saw it as an opportunity to broaden my cultural understandings and gain a better knowledge of the world around me (specifically in design). When it came to identifying a specific individual task topic it didn’t occur to me until a fellow classmate brought in a variety of Japanese treats all interestingly, yet beautifully packaged in a playful yet enticing nature that I may be able to delve into the way Asian countries (I have now specifically chosen Japan) have developed their unique design styles within the marketing culture & industry.

After investigating the small packets of treats and goodies (delivered in a beautiful neatly compacted box by a company called “Tokyo Treat”) first hand I straight away recognised a…

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2 comments

  1. “For example when I was younger I visited Tokyo myself and can remember the exact feeling of a sudden rush of overwhelming excitement and shock during my visit to a candy/treat store in during my visit. Their choice of exploding type, colour and illustration has left a happy indent in my mind of my memory of Japan.” I found this a really interesting point. I like that you have had the opportunity to experience first hand packaged goods in Japan, especially when you were a child and your design knowledge wasn’t obviously with you during this experience. Your innocence and nativity towards design structures has ‘blinded’ you so-to-speak and you were able to just enjoy the sight you had which was an immense amount of colour and fun looking illustrations that all kids would usually be attracted to. This brings on my thought process of is this and/or why isn’t this seen as ‘child-like’ in Japan? What is it about their culture and understanding that such design approaches can be appreciated by all demographics of age? OR… what is it about OUR Australian culture that makes us associate these designs as something that is child-like? Like, are we missing out on a world of happy/fun/bubbly/crazy experiences that we adapt as everyday life? 😦

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