Japanese Fashion on Instagram

Japanese_Street_Fashion_2_by_hakanphotography

I’m just going to put it out there now and say that I am an avid Instagram user. Usually I cannot go a day without accessing my Instagram account and actually have serious withdrawals when I can not access Instagram throughout the day especially when I am at university as for some reason, my phone at university seems to block the app. (Not happy Jan) While scrolling down my newsfeed on Instagram I am always bombarded with the strange, eccentric and quite amazing street fashion of Japan and always find myself in complete awe of the interesting styles and prints that the light haired Japanese men and women are wearing.

When accessing Japanese fashion on Instagram, I actually found it very easy to find a “tag” that was completely “taken over” by colourful Japanese fashion. Once I had Instagram opened on my phone, I firstly had a quick look at the “Explore” section in the app and as this section often is based on my previous searches, which included fashion and shopping, I was actually quite surprised to find an image of two young Asian men dressed in a smart looking grey suit, a black cap, horn rimmed glasses, a large brown handbag and drinking coffee and all I thought was “Yes, well that was easy.” After finding this I searched a little further into Japanese fashion on Instagram by searching the tags, I decided to be quite obvious and typed in the following searches, #japanesefashion, #japanfashion, #japanesestreetfashion resulting in over 145,647 posts. Quite amazing really for my first initial thought.

Stepping back and analyzing this account, I believe that the key principles from this encounter that might be useful for others to know is the use of hashtags and being on top of the hashtags in order to find relevant Japanese fashion. I think that hashtags are a very important aspect of researching this topic as it conveys to me the accessibility of Japanese fashion online and the ease of access that I could easily found.

In thinking about the “holes” in my general understanding of Japanese fashion, I believe that my understanding of this fashion would be very generalized as my whole understanding is based on the ideas and beliefs of what I have only seen online as well as my own beliefs and thoughts. These would include the idea that Japanese fashion is often very colourful, and very different to the clothing and fashion that we see in Australia and to be completely honest I don’t think I would be that out there to be able to strut my stuff in some typical Japanese fashion. I am looking forward to learning more about the ins and outs of Japanese fashion and actually will mainly be focusing on women’s fashion if this is possible and accessible.

I think that it is important for people not to just generalize Japanese fashion and to always be on top of research rather than just making assumptions.

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2 comments

  1. I’m intrigued to see what you find out about Japanese fashion as I myself have no idea about it, but also have the assumption that it is colourful and vastly different to our own. It would be ace if you started to include some pictures of Japanese fashion in your posts cause I’m always interested in seeing some outrageous things.
    Also, on a side note, you can access Istagram on your phone via the Freedom@UOW network only, the UOW network blocks most apps 🙂

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  2. I realise you have focused on Japanese fashion here, but I’d like to suggest looking at Chinese fashion. There’s been a lot of talk about the young generations being in love with everything high-end, from fashion to cars, and therefore being shallow and spoilt. This sort of stereotype was controversial on the dating show ‘Are You The One?’ with one contestant saying she’d rather cry in a BMW than laugh on the back of a bicycle (https://www.google.com.au/webhp?sourceid=chrome-instant&ion=1&espv=2&ie=UTF-8#q=if+you+are+the+one+i'd+rather+cry+in+a+bmw). Since that statement, the Chinese government has been interfering with the show to stifle these kind of views (although the winners still are awarded ‘fashion shoes’). Perhaps you could look into the Chinese youth’s so called obsession with fashion and its representation of money and power?

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